CUK Premiere: different styles spill in Flutebox X Maud’dib – Wicked Labour ft Black Chronical & Phoenix Da Icefire

Giving you the insight of creative minds the combination of Flutebox & Maud’dib have made its way to a studio and they have created an EP titled Brutus Stone.
Along with some great features throughout and even on this which features Black Chronical & Phoenix Da Icefire a lot of different styles merge and compliment each other in just the one song it took us from jazz to hip hop and spills into garage and shows that many great minds can create a great body of art and even when asking them about the track and the EP it shows the conversations was very emotive when putting it together.

This being your one of three tracks in your EP why was this your first single and you were very particular in putting many styles in this track.

Muad’dib
I just felt that the whole EP covers quite a bit of ground in terms of genres or styles and the space or “scene” that is closest to both of us is hiphop/rap/grime/whatever. That – if anywhere – is where we’re most recognised, I guess, that’s where most of our peers are. It just made sense that we stepped out into home turf first, if that makes sense? Also, in terms of the theme or concept, it felt like the first chapter of the story we’re trying to tell with this EP.

Flutebox
Well I felt that Brutus Stone should have come first, really. But we discussed it and I think Wicked Labour sums up the work – what we’re trying to do with this. What Muad’dib was saying made sense to me. As you say, we really wanted to have those stylistic elements in the record and Wicked Labour perhaps does the best job of bringing that together in one track.

Collab projects have been something we want more from UK artists what do you think the benefits are from that?

Muad’dib
I guess myself and the people around me tend to have a kind of camp or collective mentality – it never occurred to me to do it any other way, really. And although I sing on the record, as a producer, I never think of myself as a topline artist and I felt that toplines would really pull the record together … the whole record was an instrumental work to begin with.

Flutebox
I wouldn’t really call this a collab – it’s a piece of art. Everyone on the record is basically out of the same stable or extended camp in a way. Collabs are good because you get to step into the head of other artists. It takes you into different genres, different worlds, different ways of thinking and seeing music, but this wasn’t really a collaboration. We just made a record the way we normally make records.

Muad’dib
Although, for me, working with Brielle was definitely a very new and very much a collaborative process. Great experience, great girl, great artist.

All projects have a message and what will be your message you both want to deliver?

Muad’dib
This work is very personal to me and I wanted people to be able to relate to the story and the music in a way that was very personal to them. It’s an ode to London. An ode to the grind of life in a way.

Flutebox
Emotion, musical elements formed and delivered in a sympathetic way – delivering passion through prism of hiphop. Wanting to put feeling into it – there is no reason that hiphop shouldn’t be seen as being at least as emotionally astute as Rachmaninoff [check out Prelude in C# minor] … and bang at the same time. And of course, the whole thing is inspired by a legend – the legend of Brutus of Troy and the founding of London. We wanted it to be esoteric and show genuine love for our hometown. But we’re not trying to limit ourselves by geography – it’s about the music.

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